Little Bit More To October

Little Bit More To October

Little Bit More To October: October is generally known as the month of haunts, scares, ghouls, but did you know October is National Chili Month? Really! It’s one of many things celebrated in the month of October besides Columbus Day and Halloween. October was originally the eighth month of the Roman calendar. It comes from the Latin word “octo” meaning eight. Later, it became the 10th month when January and February were added to the Calendar. Here’s a few we’ve collected to share.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month – The lifetime risk of getting breast cancer is 1 in 8 and although it’s the second leading cause of cancer death for American women, its death rate is much lower (1 in 28). Early detection is crucial to catching the cancer, treatment and survival. Self-exams can be done at home very easily and if you find something that feels abnormal, call your doctor and make an appointment. They’ll do a manual exam and likely order a mammogram to make sure there’s not something they missed. Sometimes there is cancer or tumors that can’t be detected manually. Although October has been designated as Breast Cancer Awareness Month, women (as well as men – 400 men die each year from breast cancer) should be on the offensive and stay aware of their bodies.

National Chili Month – As the weather is changing, the color of the leaves are turning, a nice big bowl of chili might just hit the spot while you watch the game. Or you could have a cook off in your neighborhood, town, at one of the fairs, or even in your own kitchen.

National Sarcastic Awareness Month – October is a month for us to pause and be aware of the growing trend of sarcasm. Really. It’s become an epidemic and if we’re not careful, we’re going to have a situation on our hands that we won’t be able to control.

Halloween – Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred.

Little Bit More To October

 

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