Gordon Goody

Gordon Goody

Gordon Goody: Gordon Goody, who combined the rakishness of James Bond with the bravado of Jesse James to help conjure up Britain’s daredevil Great Train Robbery in 1963, died on Friday in Mojácar, Spain. He was 85. His death was confirmed by officials in Mojácar, his adopted Andalusian town on the Mediterranean, where he owned and ran the Chiringuito Kon Tiki beachfront bar after he was released from prison in 1975. No cause was specified, but he was reported to have had emphysema. y mid-1963 Mr. Goody was already a career criminal, a 33-year-old ex-convict with nine verdicts against him. A brawny 6-foot-3, he was a charismatic playboy who wore bespoke suits and a Rolex watch and drove a Jaguar.

It was the world’s largest cash robbery at the time. The gang made off with 2.6 million pounds, or the equivalent of nearly $50 million today. Little of the take, including Mr. Goody’s share, which would be worth about $3.6 million today, was recovered. After serving 12 years of a 30-year sentence, Mr. Goody left the country and largely faded away — the gang’s Quiet Man figure. Out of public view for nearly four decades, he resurfaced several years ago, granting interviews on the 50th anniversary of the heist and co-writing a book, “How to Rob a Train,” published in 2014. “I think it’s fair to say that without me there wouldn’t have been a Great Train Robbery,” Mr. Goody gloated.

Gordon Goody

 

 

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