Dealing With Panic Attacks

Dealing With Panic Attacks

Dealing With Panic Attacks: Panic attack for those who are not really sure what they are here is what wikipedia states them to be Panic attacks are periods of intense fear or apprehension of sudden onset accompanied by bodily or cognitive symptoms (such as heart palpitations, dizziness, shortness of breath, or feelings of unreality) of variable duration from minutes to hours. For example, if a child becomes extremely anxious over a thunderstorm, they may overreact and isolate themselves from the world. If it becomes too intense with no one to calm them down, it can lead to a panic attack. The symptoms of a panic attack are not dangerous, but can be very frightening. They can make you feel as though you are having a heart attack, or that you are going to collapse or even die.

Professor Paul Salkovskis, Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science at the University of Bath, says it’s important not to let your fear of panic attacks control you. “Panic attacks always pass and the symptoms are not a sign of anything harmful happening,” he says. “Tell yourself that the symptoms you’re experiencing are caused by anxiety.” He says don’t look for distractions. “Ride out the attack. Try to keep doing things. If possible, don’t leave the situation until the anxiety has subsided.”

  • Breathe in as slowly, deeply and gently as you can, through your nose.
  • Breathe out slowly, deeply and gently through your mouth.
  • Some people find it helpful to count steadily from one to five on each in-breath and each out-breath.
  • Close your eyes and focus on your breathing.

Dealing With Panic Attacks

 

You may also like...